Stanford School

Stanford Junior and Infant School

Living together - Learning together

Cooper Lane, Laceby, Grimsby
NE Lincolnshire DN37 7AX
Tel. 01472 318003
E. office@stanfordschool.co.uk
Contact. Miss King (Business Manager)

Behaviour

Supporting 21st Century citizens with life skills and a desire to make a change for good
‘Pupils are polite, well-mannered and well- behaved. They show respect and tolerance’
‘Pastoral Support is strong, and the school has a very caring ethos’
‘Pupils feel safe in school and that isolated bullying incidents are dealt with effectively by staff’
Ofsted 2019

High standards of personal behaviour, social responsibility and academic achievement are expected at Stanford Junior and Infant School. Our children will thrive in a calm, secure and caring environment, enabling them to take an active part both in our school and wider community and become responsible citizens of the future. We seek to nurture within each child the spirit of co-operation, politeness, empathy, helpfulness and a respect for other people, their cultures and beliefs, and their property.

Please see the Behaviour Policy for full details.

Positive Behaviour Rewards

 At Stanford we have many different ways to reward good work and promote positive behaviour.

Team Points - for really good work in books we give out team points. Every pupil is a member of a team and each week we count up the points and keep a running total in school and on the web. This helps to encourage children to always try their best for both themselves and their team.
Star of the Day - everyday each class gives a Star of the Day award to a pupil in their class who has shown impressive learning, effort, behaviour or kindness; or a combination of the four. Texts are sent home each week to share with parents if their child has received a Star of the Day award.
Polite Points - Polite Points simply reward behaviour which demonstrates thought, caring, good manners and a generally positive attitude to fellow members of the school. Each week every child who has received a Polite Point is entered into raffle to win a small prize and have their picture on the wall.
Postcards - Postcards are written by staff every month and delivered through the post to selected pupils. Staff are looking for pupils who have impressed them in school, either in lessons, on the playground or around school. Keep a look on for a postcard through your door!

The Golden Table

We have introduced a new reward for children showing exceptionally good behaviour choices in the dining hall at lunchtime.


Our first pupils who were selected to sit on the golden table for their manners and excellent lunchtime behaviour- Well done!

Lunchtime supervisors will be selecting children who have been showing excellent manners and lunchtime behaviours during the lunch break.Those who show that they are following the lunchtime rules may be chosen to sit at the Golden table.

Every two weeks 6 children will be chosen and receive a golden ticket during our assembly on a Friday. Those chosen will receive a special invitation, to dine at the Golden table with a buddy of their choice Those dining at the Golden Table will be served first and eat their food from golden plates. They will have juice to drink from golden cups! 
Fruit and Jelly will be served to finish!

During lunchtime we look for the following:

Golden Time

Golden time takes place on a Friday afternoon, 20 minutes before the end of the school week. Pupils are rewarded with activities of their choice, both inside and out (dependant on weather) to celebrate pupil’s positive behaviour choices in the week.

New Nurture Room Plans

The Nurture provision we offer, with our Learning Mentors, is a main focus in our school, offering support, strategies and programmes to help develop behaviour and self- esteem and reduce anxiety and manage stressors.

As our recent Ofsted report (January 2019) states:-
Pastoral support is strong, and the school has a very caring ethos.’  
‘(Parents) praise the school for the links it has with the community and the pastoral support their children receive.’

We would like to develop this further by developing a space and area and provides pupils with new resources that they would benefit from using to support games, activities and strategies to help ensure their health and well- being needs are addressed.

Pupils have helped design the new space with furniture, resources and equipment. Such resources have been specifically chosen to ensure the strong culture, vision and ethos at Stanford is represented as we work to ensure positive well-being continues to be an important aspect our school life.
These areas of the SMSC curriculum are key themes Ofsted will be monitoring, under the new Ofsted framework (from September 2019.) Amanda Spielman, Chief Inspector of Schools, has said that she “agrees that mental health and well-being are important issues” which is why personal development will be one of the four judgments proposed in the new framework.

Pupils, parents/carers and staff will benefit directly from this new space. A quiet and calming space will be used for calming down opportunities, pastoral support sessions, parent/carer meetings etc. The needs of the school community are varied and there is an undeniable increase in the need for extra provision. We have, for example, an increasing number of pupils who are on the SEN (Special Needs) register for SEMH needs (social, emotional mental health.)

Our Vision

Pupil Voice

Here at Stanford Junior and Infant School, we believe that our children are the most important people and we endeavour to give ALL children lots of opportunities to share their thoughts and opinions and play an active role in the decisions that affect their learning and well-being.

We have lots of ways that the children can do this formally, such as through the Pupil Voice meetings, pupil questionnaires and speaking to members of staff around school. However we also want to create an ethos that allows the children to regularly share their opinions in an informal way, in class and also to Mrs Hackfath. Mrs Hackfaths' door is always open to children (and staff!)

The main aim of Pupil Voice is to help to make our school a better place for the children and to give pupils an opportunity to have their opinions and ideas heard. Each class from FS upwards has two representatives a week, who join the meeting to discuss ideas and events coming up in our school calendar. Pupil Voice is led by our Head Boy and Girl and also Mrs Groves. The class representative then report back to their classes what has been discussed and the minutes are then shared on our Pupil Voice Notice board.

Prefects

As part of our citizenship education, we believe that children need to experience duties and responsibilities that come with being a member of a community in order to help them prepare to play an active role as good citizens.

At Stanford School we believe that prefects have a very important role to play in the day to day organisation of our school, one in which year 6 pupils consider a prestigious position.

Prefects are expected to set excellent examples at all times in their behaviour, the respect they show others in and around school. Our Year 6 Prefects take on many roles and have many responsibilities, such as:
Roles and responsibilities

  • Helping to set up the hall for assemblies and managing the sound and ICT during assemblies
  • Contributing to Pupil Voice
  • Promoting good behaviour, manners, politeness and to assist in helping the school run effectively
  • Encouraging children to walk down the corridors sensibly and quietly
  • Working with classes during some wet lunch times
  • Showing visitors around the school
  • Assisting at school fairs and events
  • Helping in the dining hall
  • To act as friends and buddies for those who need support
  • To support pupils on both Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 playground, assisting
  • Peer to peer collaboration

We are extremely proud of our Year 6 prefects and the roles they do around school, always using their initiative and supporting the pupils around school.

School Buddies- Assembly and Playground

In our school we have our upper Key Stage 2 pupils- Years 5 and 6 who are either Playground Buddies or Assembly Buddies in school.

Several Year 6 pupils are Assembly Buddies with their role supporting younger pupils within each class. There are several assembly buddies to each class and they support the pupils during assembly time. The buddies sit within the class rows and model exemplary behaviour to the other pupils, offer support if needed to their peers and show support and guidance to the younger pupils.

Year 5 pupils who have been trained as Playground Buddies, supporting Key Stage One pupils and encouraging active play and activities during break and lunc times. The Playground Buddies are skilled at helping the children to work and play together in school and to recognise when some children are having difficult times in the playground.

Our 'Buddy Bench' is where children sit when they would like some Buddies to help them. Pupils may need some support and encouragement during playtimes and at lunch.

 

Behaviour Management

Reflection Sheets - A Time to Reflect

At Stanford we try to give children the opportunity to not only reflect on the good things they do e.g. good work in class, but also the negative choices that they sometimes make.

As part of this process we have been trialling the use of ‘Reflection Sheets’.

These sheets are a chance for children to:

If a child receives 3 Reflection Sheets in a week or 6 in a half term they will be copied and sent home to parents, so they have an opportunity to discuss with their child the behaviours they have been displaying in school and to help them to make more positive choices in future.

The Reflection Sheets are kept on file and monitored through the year.

We transfer the information from the sheets into a simple Excel spread sheet, which helps us to monitor the behaviour in the school in real-time and identify any patterns which may occur.

The more detail we record - the clearer the picture we get!

We record Gender, Class, Week, Term, Reason, Location, Subject, Time of Day

Code Of Conduct

The children need to know what is expected of them. At the heart of our behaviour policy is the Code of Conduct which sets out clearly what behaviour is and is not acceptable. The Code of Conduct has a version for the Foundation Stage and KS1 children and a version for the KS2 children. The versions are essentially the same in both content and spirit, however are prepared with their target audience in mind.
At Stanford Junior and Infant School we expect the following without exception:

Foundation / KS1 Code of Conduct

  • Show consideration of others (Being polite, kind and helpful)
  • Be honest and truthful
  • Be respectful of others, their property and the school environment
  • Listen to others
  • Work within class in a positive and productive manner
  • Move around school quietly and calmly
  • Be proud of our school

KS2 Code of Conduct

  • Try to understand and tolerate other people’s point of view.
  • Show respect by listening and speaking to teachers, other staff, visitors and adults in a polite manner.
  • Work quietly and sensibly in class, showing courtesy and consideration to others at all times.
  • Move calmly and quietly about school, never running, pushing or shouting but being ready to help by opening doors, standing back to let people pass and helping to carry things.
  • Take care of the school environment so that it is a welcoming place of which we can all be proud, taking responsibility for keeping the environment tidy and respecting other people’s work and property.
  • Bullying of any kind will not be tolerated.
  • Out of school pupils should remember the school’s reputation depends on how they behave.
  • Pupils should be honest and truthful and lying will not be tolerated

Card System

A central part of our Behaviour Policy is the Pink, Amber, Red Card system.

Sometimes a child will make a choice that will result in either a straight Amber or Red card, without chance for a warning. Although this is unusual, it reflects those choices which children make which we do not accept in school, such as hurting another child or deliberately damaging property.

Pink

If a child breaks one of the ‘Stanford Super Six’ rules, they will be given a pink card and told, “……… (name), this is your reminder to make the right choice”.

If the child continues to make the right choices throughout the remainder of the lesson, the card will be taken back and no further consequences applied.

Amber

If the child continues to make the wrong choices, they will be given an amber card and told, “…… (name) you were asked to make the right choice, but have not done so. At playtime you will go see Mrs Smith and complete a Reflection Sheet to think about the choices you have made.”

The Reflection Sheets will be scanned and kept on file and monitored through the year If a child receives 2 amber cards in a week a phone call and text will be sent to the parent/carers and this will be monitored closely. If this continues into the following week, a letter will be sent to parents and a meeting will be arranged to discuss behaviour and strategies forward with SLT.

Red

If the wrong choices continue to be made, the child will receive a red card and sent, with their work, to a partner teacher. The child will be told ‘You have made the choice to leave the classroom to reflect on your behaviour and the choices you’ve made”. They will work in the partner teacher’s classroom as required.  The pupils will also miss their next break time and will complete a Reflection Sheet. Parents are also informed, usually by text, if their son/daughter has received a Red Card and details of the incident will be shared. If 2 red cards are received in a week, a meeting will be arranged with parents and the pupil will be in internal exclusion. Aggression towards another pupil will automatically result in a Red card and possible internal exclusion.

Anti-bullying

Bullying affects everyone, not just the bullies and the victims. It also affects those other children who watch, and less aggressive pupils can be drawn in by group pressure. Bullying is not an inevitable part of school life or a necessary part of growing up, and it rarely sorts itself out. It is clear that certain jokes, insults, intimidating/threatening behaviour, written abuse and violence are to be found in our society. No one person or group, whether staff or pupil, should have to accept this type of behaviour. Only when all issues of bullying are addressed, will a child be able to benefit from the opportunities available at our schools.

At Stanford School we believe:

Please see the Anti-Bullying Policy for full details or the Children's Anti-bullying Policy, both of which can be found on our Policies page.

Racist and Homophobic

Under Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 and Home Office Code of Practice on recording and reporting racist incidents (2000) schools are required to record and investigate all racist and homophobic incidents and report them to the Local Authority on a regular basis. 'A racist incident is any incident which is perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person.' This definition emphasises perception, so that if anyone thinks an incident is racist it will be recorded and investigated as such, however minor it may seem. Incidents involving children and adults will be recorded whether or not those responsible intended their behaviour to be racist. It should also be noted that a racist incident does not necessarily have a victim.

At Stanford School we investigate fully any racist or homophobic remarks, talking with pupils involved, ensuring a resolution takes place and parents/carers are contacted regarding the incident. We record all incidents using our CPoms system and also keep a log of racist and homophobic remarks on a central document that can be accessed by SLT. ALL logs are kept up to date and checked regularly by SLT.

Peer on Peer Abuse

Peer-on-peer abuse includes, but is not limited to:

It can even include grooming children for sexual and criminal exploitation.

Unfortunately, peer-on-peer abuse can and does happen in a whole range of settings that children attend. However, it often goes unseen. It might take place online, for example, or away from the school or setting. Therefore, at Stanford School we ensure regular training for all staff  to help them recognise the signs, and know what to do.

For schools and colleges, there’s detailed Department for Education advice on what to do if a child is sexually harassed or experiences sexual violence. This expands on the principles set out in the statutory guidance ‘Keeping children safe in education’.

We expect all staff at Stanford to be familiar with this guidance and to apply it. All staff understand child protection policies and use them. In our policy it is clear that peer-on-peer abuse will never be accepted or dismissed as ‘children being children’.

All staff at Stanford school are trained and know what to do if they come across, or are worried about, peer-on-peer abuse. They confidently know who to speak to and what action to take to make sure children are safe.


Learning Mentors

Our Learning Mentors at Stanford School are Mrs Fielding and Mrs Jones.

AT Stanford School we believe that good pastoral support focuses on nurturing and supporting the individual needs of each child. We ensure that the support needed is recognised and implemented, with all teachers and support staff working cohesively together with the school’s inclusion team. We support a range of children who are having emotional difficulties that can impact on their learning. Supporting children’s well-being and helping reduce barriers to learning.

We provide a range of interventions to support emotional well- being;

We aim to develop positive relationships with children and their families, responding quickly as possible to any issues to ensure difficulties are discussed and resolved.

Our Learning Mentors work with parents and carers on a daily basis. If you ever need to speak with our Learning Mentors please feel free to see them in school and disucss any concerns over a cup of tea and biscuits!

Learning mentor - pastoral support

What do the Pastoral Team do?

We work across school with children from Foundation to Year 6, supporting children with their emotional, social and behavioural learning. We can provide 1:1 sessions, group sessions and support during break and lunch times. We work with children for different reasons so the help we offer depends on the need of the child, but includes:

Another important part of the pastoral team’s role is to provide support and information for the parents and carers at the school. We have information on a range of issues, agencies and support services and we can give advice and support in accessing these different services as well as referring to other agencies that can offer more specialist support if needed.

What is a Learning Mentor?

A Learning Mentor helps to support children in school to overcome any difficulties that might be stopping them from engaging in school and with their learning.

Why do children work with a Learning Mentor?

Children benefit from the opportunity to talk to an adult other than a parent/carer or a teacher, someone who is not directly involved in their everyday lives. Common reasons for us to work with children range from: friendship issues, boosting self-esteem and confidence, promoting positive behaviour, developing appropriate social skills, understanding and managing emotions and supporting a child through life events and challenges both in and out of school.

Who can refer to a Learning Mentor?

Teachers, school staff, parents/carers and children themselves can ask for Learning Mentor support. The Learning Mentors will then decide what this support will look like and make contact with the family. You can ask the school office or Learning mentors for a referral form.

If you have any concerns about your child in or out of school or would like to have a chat with the Learning Mentors about what we can offer, please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us.

How long will my child see a Learning Mentor?

It depends on each child. Children come for as many sessions as they need ranging from one or two sessions, to more long term mentoring that could last a term. The work is reviewed regularly to see if it is still required.

Pastoral Support

Our vision and aims

Our Vision is to:

At Stanford School, every child matters and all children need to feel safe, valued, special, appreciated and included. We want every child coming to our school to feel happy, content and confident, ready to embrace the day in our secure, caring and friendly environment.

However, some children face many challenges, which means that some of their social and emotional needs may be greater than those of others. By using elements of The Thrive Approach, we will help support and guide the children in our care to allow them to develop emotionally and distinguish between their feelings to help them manage these appropriately.  

The school is very proud of its dedicated Learning Mentors and the Pastoral team that is able to offer support to both children and families with behaviour, special needs, attendance and emotional stability.  

We aim to:
  • Provide alternative support for children who are experiencing emotional, social or behavioural difficulties.
  • Provide a safe and calm environment for children to develop their skills.
  • Enable children to take pride in their achievements and enhance self-esteem.
  • Help children to manage their feelings and develop skills to enjoy and participate in school life.
  • Use positive approaches to manage all behaviours.

What is Thrive?

We've embraced Thrive in our setting

Thrive is a therapeutic approach to help support children with their emotional and social development.

The Thrive approach offers practical strategies and techniques and is built around identifying children’s emotional development and looks at their individual needs.

Research has shown that how we behave is linked to how we feel and our emotions are linked to how we learn. By teaching children to recognise and notice these feelings and emotions it can help with their development and learning.

Children sometimes need some extra support with their emotional growth and this can be temporary or over a longer period of time.

Thrive promotes their emotional and social growth by building positive relationships between a child and their peers and helps them explore and understand their feelings through various activities.

Why might my child attend a Thrive session?

Many children experience difficulties during their time at school. These may include:

  • Difficulties with friendships.
  • Getting into trouble at playtime.
  • Finding it hard to settle in the classroom.
  • Finding it difficult to manage their strong feelings.
  • Not knowing who to turn to when feelings are too big to manage on their own.

These situations can lead to many different feelings which may seem overwhelming at times. They might include: anger, frustration, sadness, loneliness, confusion or anxiety.

All these feelings are very normal and happen to a lot of children. The sessions our Learning Mentors provide are to help children learn to manage their feelings and teach them strategies that will help promote their learning at school.

What will happen in a Nurture session?

The session may be on an individual basis or as part of a small group of children. During each session there will be an activity which may include:

  • Story telling
  • Circle games
  • Arts and crafts
  • Sand play
  • Movement and relaxation
  • Cooking and preparing food
  • Role play and puppet work
  • Games

Attachment, Trauma and Aces

Childhood trauma has a massive impact on the life chances of children. Trauma has an impact on the brain and how the child perceives and interacts with the world around them. It is vital that staff understand this in order to fully embrace the therapeutic approaches we aim to provide at Stanford School.

Staff have recently received training on attachment, trauma and ACE’s with Ashley Lucas. Staff have gained knowledge on how the brain works and strategies to help support children who may have or have had trauma in their life and understand reasons for children’s behaviour.


Litter Picking Project

Pupils continue to support our litter-picking project – they show dedication by litter-picking every break time and have inspired other pupils to join in. Well done and thank you.

Anti Bullying Week

Respect

Our local PCSO Mark Ireland came into school to lead an assembly on respect and how the police deal with bullying behaviours in the community. The children listened to how bullying can affect the community in many different ways such as through anti-social behaviour, and how bullying can not only impact on the victim, but their friends and family too.

Seedlings Class

This week our focus has been about ‘Anti-bullying’. During the week children from Seedlings class thought about who they might talk to if they felt sad, talked about 'top tips for a happy school' and played with a new or different friend.  We also recognised extra friendly children during the week.

Sunflower Class

Pumpkin Class

This week we have been looking at anti-bullying with the theme "All Different, all equal". We looked at a jigsaw with some pieces missing and the children saw that every piece has to be in place for it to be complete.

They were then shown a jigsaw piece with the words 'Pumpkin class' and asked how could we complete this puzzle. The children were all given the same jigsaw piece and were asked to write on it all the things that made them unique. We put all these pieces together to show our how we all fit together to make something wonderful - our class.

Juniper Class: How to Banish Bullies

As part of Anti bullying week, "All equal all Different" we created our own recipes "How to Banish Bullies"

A few of us shared our recipes in assembly.

Star Anise Class

As you know this week has been Anti- Bullying Week. Star Anise have been discussing acts of kindness and have been busy making kind hands. We thought about people we could trust who we could tell if we are being bullied and wrote their names on our cut out hands.

We created a paper chain of kindness, we had a strip of coloured paper and wrote our kindness pledge on it. We also looked at the "Be Kind Campaign" which has been launched by the TV programme This Morning hosted by Phil and Holly.

As Holly said " How much better the world would be if everyone was just that bit kinder to each other?"

Written by Mareen, Darcie and Rebecca

Barley Class

Barley class became Agony Aunts during anti- bullying week. They worked collaboratively to create different scenarios that required advice. They wrote letters to their Agony Aunt, created a freeze frame of this and then wrote their reply, giving advice on how they could stop the bullying. The outcomes were fantastic, with meaningful and helpful advice given


Code of Conduct

The children need to know what is expected of them. At the heart of our behaviour policy is the Code of Conduct which sets out clearly what behaviour is and is not acceptable. The Code of Conduct has a version for the Foundation Stage and KS1 children and a version for the KS2 children. The versions are essentially the same in both content and spirit, however are prepared with their target audience in mind.

At Stanford Junior and Infant School we expect the following without exception:

Foundation / KS1 Code of Conduct

  • Show consideration of others (Being polite, kind and helpful)
  • Be honest and truthful
  • Be respectful of others, their property and the school environment
  • Listen to others
  • Work within class in a positive and productive manner
  • Move around school quietly and calmly
  • Be proud of our school

KS2 Code of Conduct

  • Try to understand and tolerate other people’s point of view.
  • Show respect by listening and speaking to teachers, other staff, visitors and adults in a polite manner.
  • Work quietly and sensibly in class, showing courtesy and consideration to others at all times.
  • Move calmly and quietly about school, never running, pushing or shouting but being ready to help by opening doors, standing back to let people pass and helping to carry things.
  • Take care of the school environment so that it is a welcoming place of which we can all be proud, taking responsibility for keeping the environment tidy and respecting other people’s work and property.
  • Bullying of any kind will not be tolerated.
  • Out of school pupils should remember the school’s reputation depends on how they behave.
  • Pupils should be honest and truthful and lying will not be tolerated

Positive Behaviour Rewards

Polite PointsAt Stanford we have many different ways to reward good work and promote positive behaviour.

Team Points - for really good work in books we give out team points. Every pupil is a member of a team and each week we count up the points and keep a running total in school and on the web. This helps to encourage children to always try their best for both themselves and their team.

Star of the Day - everyday each class gives a Star of the Day award to a pupil in their class who has shown impressive learning, effort, behaviour or kindness; or a combination of the four. Texts are sent home each week to share with parents if their child has received a Star of the Day award.    

Polite Points - Polite Points simply reward behaviour which demonstrates thought, caring, good manners and a generally positive attitude to fellow members of the school. Each week every child who has received a Polite Point is entered into raffle to win a small prize and have their picture on the wall!

Anti-bullying

Bullying affects everyone, not just the bullies and the victims. It also affects those other children who watch, and less aggressive pupils can be drawn in by group pressure. Bullying is not an inevitable part of school life or a necessary part of growing up, and it rarely sorts itself out. It is clear that certain jokes, insults, intimidating/threatening behaviour, written abuse and violence are to be found in our society. No one person or group, whether staff or pupil, should have to accept this type of behaviour. Only when all issues of bullying are addressed, will a child be able to benefit from the opportunities available at our schools.

At Stanford School we believe:

Please see the Anti-Bullying Policy for full details or the Children's Anti-bullying Policy, both of which can be found on our Policies page.

Card System

A central part of our Behaviour Policy is the Pink, Amber, Red Card system.

Sometimes a child will make a choice that will result in either a straight Amber or Red card, without chance for a warning. Although this is unusual, it reflects those choices which children make which we do not accept in school, such as hurting another child or deliberately damaging property.

Pink

If a child breaks one of the ‘Stanford Super Six’ rules, they will be given a pink card and told, “……… (name), this is your reminder to make the right choice”.

If the child continues to make the right choices throughout the remainder of the lesson, the card will be taken back and no further consequences applied.

Amber

If the child continues to make the wrong choices, they will be given an amber card and told, “…… (name) you were asked to make the right choice, but have not done so. At playtime you will go to The Pod to see Mr Hawkins and complete a Reflection Sheet to think about the choices you have made.”

The Reflection Sheets will be kept on file and monitored through the year. If a child receives 3 Reflection Sheets in a week, or 6 in a half term, they will be copied and sent home to parents.

Parents will be asked to sign and return a sheet to acknowledge receipt of the sheets. Parents will be able to make comments on the reply slip should they wish.

Red

If the wrong choices continue to be made, the child will receive a red card and sent, with their work, to a partner teacher. The child will be told ‘You have made the choice to leave the classroom to reflect on your behaviour and the choices you’ve made”. They will then sit for 5 minutes in the partner teacher’s classroom, using the 5 minute timer. A message will be placed on the wall at the place they sit to encourage reflection. As follows:

  • Once the timer has finished they should return to their classroom of their own accord, thus taking responsibility for their own behaviour.
  • If the child reaches the third warning, and receives a red card, the Teacher or TA a phone call to their parent to explain their behaviour will take place.
Reflection Sheets - A Time to Reflect

We try to give children the opportunity to not only reflect on the good things they do e.g. good work in class, but also the negative choices that they sometimes make.

Reflection Sheets are a chance for children to:

  • Think about the decisions they made or actions they took in words or pictures, why this may have been the wrong choice to make and what they could do next time to avoid it happening again.
  • If a child receives 3 Reflection Sheets in a week or 6 in a half term they will be copied and sent home to parents, so they have an opportunity to discuss with their child the behaviours they have been displaying in school and to help them to make more positive choices in future. 

Play Leaders and Behaviour Ambassador

Pupils may also be chosen to act as mentors to other pupils if they have shown positive behaviour choices. Behaviour Ambassadors are take charge of spotting and rewarding good behaviours to learning. Prefects, Play Buddies and monitors are also important roles that are used to motivate and reward pupils to add to the respectful and positive culture at Stanford. Our Play Leaders and Play Buddies help to organise activities to give younger children the opportunity to learn new games and to work as a team.